Birds’ Nests

Hello there!  This week has been a fairly quiet one for me nature wise.  I’ve of course fed my garden birds and looked after my darling mouse and enjoyed a morning with Spring Common school at the nature reserve, but there isn’t much to report from the garden and I haven’t been on any particularly pleasant walks.  I’ve been a little obsessed with knitting this week – finishing off my shawl has clearly inspired me (more info on my shawl in next week’s crafty blog over on Stephanelli Designs!).

So for this week, I thought I’d share with you a couple of photos of some birds’ nests which we found while doing some clearing of brambles at the nature reserve.  Of course most people know that birds make nests to have their eggs in…but have you ever seen one in real life?  I remember as a child in the autumn being able to see a blackbirds nest that was in a small tree that climbed up our shed.  The nest was positioned right close to the shed window so you could look into it!  I don’t remember whether that nest was a success or not – our neighbours had cats which were partial to a bird or two.

We first found the nests in last weeks morning at the reserve, and this week we managed to get them out – pretty much intact!  The first we got out was small – but they are so intricately made!  I find it hard to imagine a bird using just its beak to weave its materials together into something that can hold a brood of chicks.  While I was knitting this morning I realised that it was akin to me trying to knit with only two fingers!  Birds really are marvellous creatures!  But, this first nest is small and we were thinking maybe a dunnock or robin – but we’re no experts on this so don’t take that as a definite thing!

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Obviously I shouldn’t need to add the warning (but I will anyway) that you should only remove the nests if you are absolutely certain that the birds have finished using it – we wouldn’t be removing brambles at the reserve if there was any chance of birds still nesting!

The second nest we found was larger, probably home to something like a blackbird or maybe even a thrush.  It was much harder to get out – being well made into the brambles!  This seems messier and was made of bigger materials – probably because the bird itself is bigger!  Birds nests can be lined on the inside or the outside, and while we saw no evidence of this, it may be that it has disintegrated since the chicks fledged.  This nest was also surprisingly heavy – I wouldn’t have expected a mass of twigs to be like that!

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Both nests were found surprisingly low down in the brambles – surprisingly low for me anyway!  They were an interesting find though and I really enjoyed taking a look at them in closer detail!  I hope you enjoyed this post – doing well with the regular blogging so far – I have high hopes it will continue!

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This entry was published on September 30, 2016 at 2:30 pm. It’s filed under Godmanchester Nature Reserve and tagged . Bookmark the permalink. Follow any comments here with the RSS feed for this post.

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